iPost – 2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for iPost blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 35,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 13 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

7 Nelson Mandela Quotes You Probably Won’t See In The U.S. Media

7. On the U.S. war with Iraq:

“If there is a country that has committed unspeakable atrocities in the world, it is the United States of America. They don’t care for human beings.” Via cbsnews.com

6. On Israel:

“Israel should withdraw from all the areas which it won from the Arabs in 1967, and in particular Israel should withdraw completely from the Golan Heights, from south Lebanon and from the West Bank.” Via jweekly.com

5. On the U.S. war with Iraq:

“All that (Mr. Bush) wants is Iraqi oil.” Via cbsnews.com

4. Mandela on Castro and the Cuban revolution:

“From its earliest days, the Cuban Revolution has also been a source of inspiration to all freedom-loving people. We admire the sacrifices of the Cuban people in maintaining their independence and sovereignty in the face of the vicious imperialist-orquestrated campaign to destroy the impressive gain made in the Cuban Revolution. … Long live the Cuban Revolution. Long live comrade Fidel Castro.” Via lanic.utexas.edu

3. Mandela on Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi, his longtime supporter:

“It is our duty to give support to the brother leader … especially in regards to the sanctions which are not hitting just him, they are hitting the ordinary masses of the people … our African brothers and sisters.” Via finalcall.com

2. On the U.S. preparing to invade Iraq in a 2002 interview with Newsweek:

“If you look at those matters, you will come to the conclusion that the attitude of the United States of America is a threat to world peace.” Via newsweek.com

1. On a Palestinian state:

“The UN took a strong stand against apartheid; and over the years, an international consensus was built, which helped to bring an end to this iniquitous system. But we know too well that our freedom is incomplete without the freedom of the Palestinians.” Via cbsnews.com

Neelum Valley وادیِ نیلم, Pakistan. Paradise is right here.

Neelam Valley (also spelled Neelum Valley) (Urdu: وادیِ نیلم ‎) is a 200 km long bow-shaped deeply forested region in Azad Kashmir, Pakistan. It is consist of Neelam District has two tehsils Athmuqam and Shardah.

Neelam Valley is situated at the North & North-East of Muzaffarabad, running parallel to Kaghan Valley. The two valleys are only separated by snow-covered peaks, some over 4,000 meters (Bad rounding here13,000 ft) above sea level.

The valley possesses scenic beauty, panoramic views, towering hills on both sides of the noisy Neelam river, lush green forests, enchanting streams and attractive surroundings. More>>

14 teenage girls sentenced to 11 years in prison in #Egypt.

 

The women, aged 15 to 22 — 15 of whom are minors — were arrested by security forces as they attempted to form a human chain on the Corniche, and are being detained for 15 days pending investigations.

“7 am” is a youth movement launched late last month in protest against what members call the military coup that ousted former President Mohamed Morsi on July 3. The movement is peaceful and was launched in Alexandria, with plans to spread to the rest of Egypt’s governorates, according to the group’s Facebook page.

The Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR) and the Association for Freedom of Thought and Expression (AFTE) issued a joint statement decrying the arrests. The statement quoted the protest movement’s spokesperson as saying that there had been minor altercations between the protesters and local residents Thursday morning, but that these conflicts were quickly contained.

Security forces then intervened and arrested the demonstrators, transferring them to the Alexandria Security Directorate. The general prosecution accused the women of belonging to the recently banned Muslim Brotherhood, illegal assembly, illegal possession of flyers, threatening violence and obstructing public transport.

Their lawyer’s appeal against their detention was refused.

EIPR and AFTE accused the security forces of employing the same repressive practices as they had under the fallen Mubarak regime.

This arrest occurred in the context of other ongoing violations committed by security forces against freedom of expression and peaceful protest, the statement said.

The right to peaceful protest must be guaranteed, and these oppressive practices must not be tolerated — especially against female protesters, who have long fought against their marginalization from politics, the rights groups asserted.

Malala – The Daughter of Pakistan

 

Malala Yousafzai was born on July 12, 1997, in Mingora, Pakistan. As a child, she became an advocate for girls’ education, which resulted in the Taliban issuing a death threat against her. On October 9, 2012, a gunman shot Malala when she was traveling home from school. She survived, and has continued to speak out on the importance of education. In 2013, she was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.

Initial Activism

Malala attended a school that her father, Ziauddin Yousafzai, had founded. After the Taliban began attacking girls’ schools in Swat, she gave a speech in Peshawar, Pakistan, in September 2008. The title of her talk was, “How dare the Taliban take away my basic right to education?”

In early 2009, Malala began blogging for the BBC about living under the Taliban’s threats to deny her an education. In order to hide her identity, she used the name Gul Makai. However, she was revealed to be the BBC blogger in December of that year.

With a growing public platform, Malala continued to speak out about her right, and the right of all women, to an education. Her activism resulted in a nomination for the International Children’s Peace Prize in 2011. That same year, she was awarded Pakistan’s National Youth Peace Prize.

Targeted by the Taliban

When she was 14, Malala and her family learned that the Taliban had issued a death threat against her. Though Malala was frightened for the safety of her father—an anti-Taliban activist—she and her family initially felt that the fundamentalist group would not actually harm a child.

On October 9, 2012, on her way home from school, a man boarded the bus Malala was riding in and demanded to know which girl was Malala. When her friends looked toward Malala, her location was given away. The gunman fired at her, hitting Malala in the left side of her head; the bullet then traveled down her neck. Two other girls were also injured in the attack.

The shooting left Malala in critical condition, so she was flown to a military hospital in Peshawar. A portion of her skull was removed to treat her swelling brain. To receive further care, she was transferred to Birmingham, England.

After the Attack

Once she was in the United Kingdom, Malala was taken out of a medically induced coma. Though she would require multiple surgeries—including repair of a facial nerve to fix the paralyzed left side of her face—she had suffered no major brain damage. In March 2013, she was able to begin attending school in Birmingham.

The shooting resulted in a massive outpouring of support for Malala, which continued during her recovery. She gave a speech at the United Nations on her 16th birthday, in 2013. She has also written an autobiography, I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban, which was released in October 2013. Unfortunately, the Taliban still considers Malala a target.

Despite the Taliban’s threats, Malala remains a staunch advocate for the power of education. On October 10, 2013, in acknowledgement of her work, the European Parliament awarded her the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought. She has also been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.